Archive for the 'Fun Things to Do Outdoors' Category

Upcoming Event Near Lake of the Pines, Auburn Ca. ~ Auburn Spring Home Show

said on May 15th, 2013 filed under: Auburn, Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Gardening, Lake of the Pines, Localism

Upcoming Event Near Lake of the Pines, Auburn Ca. ~ Auburn Spring Home Show is coming this weekend May 17th – 19th 2013. This event takes place at the Gold Country Fairgrounds. continue reading…

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Upcoming Local Event in Auburn, Ca. Near Lake of the Pines ~ AUBURN CRUISE NIGHT

said on April 29th, 2013 filed under: Auburn, Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Lake of the Pines, Localism

Upcoming Local Event in Auburn, Ca. near Lake of the Pines ~ AUBURN CRUISE NIGHT. This fun event begins May 10th – September 13, 2013 from 5 p.m. – 9 p.m. the 2nd Friday of each month. Upper Lincoln Way Auburn, Ca. 95603 530-878-7936  continue reading…

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Auburn, Ca. Upcoming Local Event: Fast Fridays Speedway

said on April 26th, 2013 filed under: Auburn, Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Localism

Auburn, Ca. Upcoming Local Event: Fast Fridays Speedway begins May 10th with the Season Opener! This event runs from May – October 2013 and is located at Gold Country Fairgrounds in Auburn, Ca. continue reading…

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Upcoming Event in Auburn, Ca. ~ AUBURN WILD WEST STAMPEDE-RODEO

said on April 16th, 2013 filed under: Auburn, Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Localism

Upcoming Event in Auburn, Ca. ~ AUBURN WILD WEST  STAMPEDE-RODEO! continue reading…

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Upcoming Local Event near Auburn, Ca. ~ Keeping Kids Safe Festival

said on April 15th, 2013 filed under: Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Grass Valley, Localism

Upcoming Local Event near Auburn, Ca. ~ Keeping Kids Safe Festival is on Saturday April 20, 2013 from 10 am – 4pm. continue reading…

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Lake of the Pines Easter Egg Hunt

said on March 30th, 2013 filed under: Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Lake of the Pines, Localism, Whimsy

 

Lake of the Pines Easter Egg Hunt, or . . .

 

I Married the Easter Bunny!

There must have been a record number of children at the annual Easter Egg Hunt.

By the time I arrived, the first wave of toddlers had already completed their mad dash to egg satiation, and the second wave, the middle-aged ruffians were lining up.

The star of course is the Easter Bunny herself.

Hmmm, those ears . . . ?

That nose . . . ?

It all looks so familiar.  If only I could get a look at that cute little cotton tail, I would know for sure.

Yes!  It is her.  Shhhhhhh!  Do not tell a soul under 14 years old.  That’s CJ Jenkins handing out sweets and hugs.

I married the Easter Bunny!

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Running the Spenceville Wildlife Trails

said on February 22nd, 2013 filed under: Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Localism, Running and Hiking trails

Running the Spenceville Wildlife Trails.

How to get there: Take Highway 20 out of Grass valley heading west toward Marysville and Yuba City. Just after you cross the Nevada County line take the road to the left called “Beal Air Force Base.” It’s actually the Smartville Road, but never mind. After a mile, turn left on Chuck Yeager Road. Go about 4 more miles. Turn left on Waldo Road and follow it to the trailhead. It’s dirt and gravel, dusty but not too rough. Do not take the Camp Farwest road to the right. Just stay on Waldo. In a couple of miles it stops. That’s the trail head. Stretch and walk across the old con crete bride and then follow the directions in my video.

Click here if you want to read the article called “Spenceville Dogs”

I hope you enjoyed our little outing, Running the Spenceville Wildlife Trails.  Adios.  See you on the next run.

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Go for a Run on the Yuba River with Bob

said on February 10th, 2013 filed under: Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Localism, Running and Hiking trails

Today we’ll run about 8 miles, 4 miles out and 4 miles back, along the South Fork of the Yuba River, the soul of Nevada County.  We’ll head up highway 49 and just as we get to the north edge of Nevada City we’ll take that sharp left turn that Highway 49 makes to head further north toward Downieville.  If you miss this turn, and it’s easy to do, you will be on Highway 20 heading east toward Tahoe.  That’s a nice road, but not the one you want to be on.

As soon as you make that Highway 49 jog to the left, look for the first road to the right, Coyote Road.  Turn right onto Coyote and wind uphill for about a mile.  You will come out on North Bloomfoeld Road.  Turn right and stay on this road for 6 or 7 miles.  The last mile will wind down into the South Yuba Canyon.  The correct name is South Fork of the Yuba, but if you say South Yuba everyone will know what you are talking about.

Park at the closest end of the bridge.  There is a toilet, but no running water.  Actually there is running water, a picturesque little creek burbling down to the parking lot, but I don’t recommend drinking out of it. Get out.   Go the the outhouse if you are in need.  Walk out on the Edwards Crossing bridge.  It’s a great place to stretch before your run or hike.  Spend a few minutes looking upstream and downstream.  Be quiet.  Listen.  Feel the sweet vibration.

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Bear River Clean Up

said on September 15th, 2012 filed under: Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Localism, Whimsy

Bear River (Rio Oso) divides north Placer and south Nevada counties in the lower foothills of California.  Each year volunteers from the nearby communities gather at the one-lane bridge where Dog Bar Road crosses the river to clean up our little “Bear.”  For the past decade local high school teacher, Jeff Carrow, who coaches and teaches at Bear River High School (appropriate, isn’t it?) organizes a crew of students to come out on a Saturday morning with trash bags and gloves.

Frequently I attach myself to Jeff’s group.  He taught English to my son, Luke, and pretends to know who I am.  Anyway, he seems happy with the extra help.  This year I brought along a friend and client, Rich Gregerson.  Do I know how to show my clients a good time or what?

Dharma, of course, loves to come along, though as she ages, it’s more supervisory than particpatory.

Here are some of Jeff’s kids performing a “sweep” of the shallows.

This is the Diving Pool where the more adventurous hurl themselves from the rocks into the deep (ish) waters below.  I have, myself, performed this feat of deering-do on many occasions.

I am pleased to report that the river and riverbanks were much cleaner than in years past, and by the time we left, the Bear was, once again, pristine and clean.

My haul?

plastic water bottles (3)

bottle caps (several)

broken glass (a small handful)

cigarette butts (thousands, so it seemed)

and the piece d’resistance . . .

a pair of men’s briefs (royal blue)

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A Tale of Two Dumps (part 2)

said on August 16th, 2012 filed under: Fun Things to Do Outdoors, Grass Valley, Localism, Whimsy

Herein lies a tale of two dumps, Auburn and Grass Valley.  Actually, we no longer call them “dumps” as we did in olden times.  Now they are known by high-faluting titles such as Waste Reclamation Sites, or Transfer Stations, or Recology Facilities.  Are you impressed?  I’m not.  They are still dumps to me, delightfully stinky, dusty places where you take your garbage and unwanted detritus and dump it.

I am going to compare the Auburn Transfer Station with the McCourtney (Grass Valley) Transfer Station.  Sorry, ladies, these articles are, as CJ calls them, “icky boy stuff.”  I enjoy going to the dump, and I just can’t understand why CJ doesn’t get it.  Go figure.

The McCourtney Transfer Station

Hours:  8 am to 3:00 pm every day of the week (I thought McCourtney was closed on Monday and Tuesday, but I am looking at the new brochure and it plainly says, “every day.”)

How to get there:  From Grass Valley head southwest on McCourtney Road. Turn left just past the Animal Shelter a couple of miles out of town.  From south Nevada County, go with someone who knows how to get there on the back roads (Wolf to Duggans to Lime Kiln to McCourtney without getting lost out on Perimeter Road)

It’s a beautiful drive no matter how you go.

And it’s friendly at McCourtney!

Before you even go into the main Transfer Station, there is a little dirt road to the left that will take you down to the Green Waste area where you can dump leaves, brush, branches, lawn clippings, small trees (less than 18″) and untreated and unpainted wood.  By the way, your wood waste can still have nails in it,  I don’t know how that works, but it’s OK by me.  Supposedly, you are charged $2.25 per cubic yard, but it usually works out to about $5 to $8 for a pickup truck full of green stuff.  The guy at the shed looks at your load, scratches his beard, and says “Six bucks” or something like that.

Now, buckle up kids, it’s time to enter the best dump in the foothills, The McCourtney Transfer Station!

Un-like the Auburn Transfer Station, at McCourtney you start at the “Kiosk” for registration then get in the left lane for the “Scale.”  Cost is determined strictly by weight.  Residential waste is currently $70 per ton.  That’s a lot of garbage, a ton, a couple of pick up trucks usually.  By the way, I heard a rumor that with the recent “take-over” by Waste Management, the rates had gone up.  Not true.  So far, anyway.

Sometimes there is a line to weigh in at the Scale  Here’s a trick:  if you have scrap metal, recycle materials, appliances, or hazardous waste, go unload those items first, then you can wedge back into the Scale line.  The first station you will come to on the “tricky” route  is the Buy Back Shack.  You can sell your bottles, cans and so forth.  Unloading scrap metal is FREE at McCourtney (shame on Auburn for charging us for something they are going to sell) and, get this, there is always someone at McCourtney to help you get the heavy stuff off your truck.

There are stations to rid yourself of oil and paint, and other stations to get rid of  batteries and electronics.  FREE!  Yep.  That’s what I said.

You can unload your old refrigerators and air conditioners for $20 each.  Why does this cost twenty bucks?  A technician has to dismantle the unit the remove the refrigerants and/or oils.  Tires cost between $2 and $10 depending upon size.  Batteries are free.

At McCourtney, they will take almost anything.  Hazardous waste disposal is FREE.  It makes sense if you think about it.  The county would rather absorb the cost of proper disposal than encourage you to dump it out in the forest where the land will have to absorb the toxins.  So you drive through this shed and a technician in a white cover-all will unload your weird chemicals and unknown bottles of whatever.  Do NOT get out of the truck unless instructed, or you WILL get scolded.  By the way, you do NOT get any containers back.  There is a limit of 15 gallons or 125 pounds.

So, having dropped off your weird stuff for FREE and butted back in line, you weigh in at the Scale and head to the C&D station (construction and demolition) or the big Garbage Pit for mixed garbage.  The photo below is the construction debris area.  It costs slightly less than the mixed garbage rate.  I thing it is currently $60 per ton for construction debris.

This is the big pit.  They probably have a fancier name for it, but big pit works for me.

Notice how open and airy it is?  Not icky at all.  Back your truck up and get dumping!

Isn’t this fun?

Bulldozers!  Yay!  Boy stuff!

I love the McCourtney Transfer Station!

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